Janet Edmonds

Embroiderer, Tutor, Author


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Print to Stitch Workshops

Print to stitch – workshops

Print and shift
This workshop explores the printed surface, using over printing methods, shifting register to create ghosted images, mixed colour and tonal possibilities. Simple shape is repeated, reversed and half drops created.

  • Over print an image, shifting the print on successive layers of printing.
  • Layer up prints on tissue paper or transparent fabric blending and mixing colour.
  • Print onto acetate, move it around over other prints.
  • Print light on dark and dark on light.

Print; Raise the level
A workshop for those wishing to explore methods of raised printed surfaces. Various techniques will be demonstrated including Expandaprint, fabric slips, padding, cutting out, wire mesh.

  • Print with expandaprint
  • Cut out prints and raise them up on foam board – stick fabric to foam board and print onto it
  • Cut and stuff – broderie perse
  • Print with transfer paint – cut out areas with soldering iron(evelon – suedeFX)
  • Put prints onto wire mesh and manipulate – beads?

Print for cutwork
Explore cut surfaces to create lacey fabrics or cut shapes to hang together or with other elements.

  • cut out areas and stitch edges, fill spaces with stitch by hand or machine. Resulting fabric could be manipulated.
  • cut into edges, methods ideal for treating edges of panels or wall-hangings
  • cut slits and slots, and amalgamate pieces together
  • assemble cut slices together, by threading onto a linier element, strong thread, dowel, wire or perspex
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Personal Statement

Janet Edmonds works in three dimensions, exploring manipulated fabric in a variety of ways. Ideas and inspiration are drawn from Nature’s structures and rhythms, the overlay of time, memory and the accumulation of information. Time erodes physical material, wearing away surface and detail, leaving behind a trace of what has gone before but with an experience that accumulates and expands.

This collection of stones represents a network of connections across time. Individually, each one is a stored memory with a separate experience, but together, they express a labyrinth of collective memory.